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Launch of Our Fathers by Karin Brynard & Agents of State by Mike Nicol

Wednesday, October 26th 2016 at 5:30 PM

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Launch of The Truth About Relationships by Stefan Blom

Tuesday, October 25th 2016 at 5:30 PM

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In this book Stefan Blom guides you to improve your relationships, whether with your partner, family or friends. This practical guide shows you how to work smarter in your relationships, teaches you how to re-establish and improve connection, love, communication, trust, sex and intimacy, and gives tips on resolving conflicts with a loved one in a healthy way. He blows the whistle on couples therapy and tells you that no matter what state your relationship is in, you are responsible for it and you are responsible for getting it back on track. Each chapter teaches you a skill that supports greater relationship satisfaction. To have a real connection is the ultimate goal. The Truth about Relationships is easy to understand and filled with real, practical advice to help your relationships thrive.

Stefan Blom is a clinical psychologist specialising in couples and relationships. He loves working with people who are trying to make sense of their relationships. He has been in private practice for the past 16 years and lives in Cape Town.

 

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Launch of Language & Power in Post-Colonial Schooling by Carolyn McKinney

Monday, October 24th 2016 at 5:30 PM

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October 2016

Monday, October 24th 2016 at 10:41 AM

Fiction

 

 

Bright, Precious Days by Jay McInerney

 

Image result for Bright, Precious Days by Jay McInerneyRussell and Corrine Calloway have spent half their lives in the bright lights of New York. Theirs is the generation that flew too close to the sun on wings of cocaine – and whose lives changed irrevocably when planes crashed into the Twin Towers. Now, in 2008, Russell runs his own publishing house and Corrine manages a food redistribution programme. He clings to their loft and the illusion of downtown bohemia, while she longs to have more space for their twelve-year-old twins.

Although they try to forget each other’s past indiscretions, when Jeff Pierce’s posthumous, autobiographical novel garners a new cult following, the memory of their friend begins to haunt the couple, and their marriage feels increasingly unstable. Not helped by the reappearance of Corrine’s former lover, Luke McGavock, whose ardour seems no cooler despite having a beautiful new wife in tow.

Acutely observed and brilliantly told, Bright, Precious Days dissects the moral complexities of relationships, while painting a portrait of New York as Obama and Clinton battle for leadership and the collapse of Lehman Brothers looms. A moving, deeply humane novel about the mistakes we make, persistence in struggle and love’s ability to adapt and survive, it confirms McInerney as a great chronicler of our times.

 

Don’t miss Jay McInerney at the Book Lounge on Tuesday November 8th!

 

“One of the most gifted writers of his generation … Whatever he does makes fascinating reading.””                  Observer

“No contemporary author quite matches Jay McInerney.”               Mail on Sunday

“Not only a brilliant stylist but a master of characterization, with a keen eye for the incongruities of urban life.”                        New York Times

“McInerney joins a small number of dissident novelists, headed by Norman Mailer, who change the way we look at American history.”                  Sunday Telegraph

“A scabrously scintillating stylist.”                 Guardian

“McInerney has a gift for the simultaneous perception of the glamour and tawdriness of city life.”                     Evening Standard

“Our modern-day Fitzgerald evokes New York’s fading glamour in Bright, Precious Days.”                       Vanity Fair

 

 

The Nix by Nathan Hill

Meet Samuel: stalled writer, bored teacher at a local college, obsessive player of online video games. He hasn’t seen his mother, Faye, in decades, not since she abandoned her family when he was a boy. Now she has suddenly reappeared, having committed an absurd politically motivated crime that electrifies the nightly news, beguiles the Internet, and inflames a divided America. The media paints Faye as a radical hippie with a sordid past, but as far as Samuel knows, his mother was an ordinary girl who married her high-school sweetheart. Which version of his mother is true? Two facts are certain: she’s facing some serious charges, and she needs Samuel’s help.

As Samuel begins to excavate his mother’s – and his country’s – history, the story moves from the rural Midwest of the 1960s, to New York City during Occupy Wall Street, back to Chicago in 1968 and, finally, to wartime Norway, home of the mysterious Nix. Samuel will unexpectedly find that he has to rethink everything he ever knew about his mother – a woman with an epic story of her own, a story she has kept hidden from the world.

 

“Nathan Hill is a maestro, a maestro of being terrific.”       John Irving

“Hill has so much talent to burn that he can pull off just about any style, imagine himself into any person and convincingly portray any place or time. The Nix is hugely entertaining and unfailingly smart, and the author seems incapable of writing a pedestrian sentence or spinning a boring story.”                  New York Times Book Review

“We’re in the presence of a major new comic novelist . . . a brilliant, endearing writer . . . Readers . . . will be dazzled.”                    
Washington Post

“There is an accidental topicality in Hill’s debut, about an estranged mother and son whose fates hinge on two mirror-image political events – the Democratic Convention of 1968 and the Republican Convention of 2004. But beyond that hook lies a high-risk, high-reward playfulness with structure and tone: comic set pieces, digressions into myth, and formal larks that call to mind Jennifer Egan’s A Visit From the Goon Squad.”                     New York Magazine

“Nathan Hill Is Compared to John Irving. Irving Compares Him to Dickens.”                                  
New York Times

 

 

 

Conclave by Robert Harris

Unputdownable.”                   Guardian
Gripping.”                   Sunday Times 

The Pope is dead.

Behind the locked doors of the Sistine Chapel, one hundred and eighteen cardinals from all over the globe will cast their votes in the world’s most secretive election.

They are holy men. But they have ambition. And they have rivals.

Over the next seventy-two hours one of them will become the most powerful spiritual figure on earth.
Gripping . . . like an ecclesiastical version of House of Cards.”                    The Times

Well-researched, intelligently observed and highly credible . . . Fast-moving and suspenseful, it’s elegantly written entertainment from a first-rate storyteller.”                         Mail on Sunday

“Grips like a vice and manages to convey all the drama of an election without resorting to melodrama”                         Jake Kerridge

“An electric read, like a shot of adrenalin to the heart…rollicking and literate…an insightful and witty thriller”              
 Literary Review

 

 

 

Judas by Amos Oz

Shmuel, a young, idealistic student, is drawn to a mysterious handwritten note on a campus noticeboard. This takes him to a strange house, where an elderly invalid man requires a paid companion, to argue with and read to him. But there is someone else in the house, too… A woman, who is trailed by ghosts from her past. Shmuel is captivated by her, a sexual obsession which evolves into gentle love and devotion; and he is pulled to the old man, an intellectual obsession which also evolves into gentle love and devotion. Shmuel begins to uncover the house’s tangled history and, in doing so, reaches an understanding that harks back not only to the beginning of the Jewish-Arab conflict, but also the beginning of Jerusalem itself – to Christianity, to Judaism, to Judas.

Set in the still-divided Jerusalem of 1959–60, Judas is an exquisite love story and coming-of-age tale, and a radical rethinking of the concept of treason. It is a novel steeped in desire and curiosity from one of Israel’s greatest living writers.

 

“[Judas is] many-layered, thought-provoking and – in its love story – delicate as a chrysalis, this is an old-fashioned novel of ideas that is strikingly and compellingly modern.”              Peter Stanford, Observer

“A very absorbing addition to his remarkable oeuvre”          Andrew Motion, Guardian

“This book is compassionate as well as painfully provocative, a contribution to some sort of deeper listening to the dissonances emerging from deep within the politics and theology of Israel and Palestine.”                        New Statesman

“After almost two dozen books that track changes in both heart and state with untiring strength and subtlety, the Israeli master has delivered one of the boldest of all his works… Nicholas de Lange, Oz’s distinguished translator, steers these virtuoso transitions between debate and domesticity with unerring skill… Oz can imagine, and inhabit, treachery of every stripe. But he keeps faith with the art of fiction.”                       Boyd Tonkin, Financial Times

 

 

 

Darktown by Thomas Mullen

 


Darktown
 is a relentlessly gripping, highly intelligent crime novel set in Atlanta in 1948, following the city’s first black police force investigating a brutal murder against all the odds.

‘Magnificent and shocking’                Sunday Times

Atlanta, 1948. In this city, all crime is black and white.

On one side of the tracks are the rich, white neighbourhoods; on the other, Darktown, the African-American area guarded by the city’s first black police force of only eight men. These cops are kept near-powerless by the authorities: they can’t arrest white suspects; they can’t drive a squad car; they must operate out of a dingy basement.

When a poor black woman is killed in Darktown having been last seen in a car with a rich white man, no one seems to care except for Boggs and Smith, two black cops from vastly different backgrounds. Pressured from all sides, they will risk their jobs, the trust of their community and even their own lives to investigate her death.

Their efforts bring them up against a brutal old-school cop, Dunlow, who has long run Darktown as his own turf – but Dunlow’s idealistic young partner, Rakestraw, is a young progressive who may be willing to make allies across colour lines . . .

Mullen blends the classic ingredients of det-fic noir with a well-researched and searing portrayal of pre-civil rights racial division. Magnificent and shocking (Sunday Times)

“One incendiary image ignites the next in this highly combustible procedural, set in the city’s rigidly segregated black neighborhoods during the pre-civil-rights era and written with a ferocious passion that’ll knock the wind out of you.”                       New York Times

“A terrific story that raises issues that have not vanished.”              Marcel Berlins, The Times

“From the very first page of Darktown, I was stunned, mesmerized, and instantly a huge fan of Tom Mullen. Beyond the history and the thrilling mystery, the book’s soul lies in the burgeoning partnership (and dare I say friendship) at the center of the book. It’s a reminder of the ties that cut across race in America. There is nothing I love more in a book than hope.”                    Attica Locke, author of Black Water Rising

“A fine, unflinching example of the increasingly widespread use of crime fiction to explore social issues; its plot is gripping.”                AD Miller, The Economist

“Fine Southern storytelling meets hard-boiled crime in a tale that connects an overlooked chapter of history to our own continuing struggles with race today.”               Charles Frazier, author of Cold Mountain

 

 

Inch Levels by Neil Hegarty

 

Patrick Jackson lies on his deathbed in Derry and recalls a family history marked by secrecy and silence, and a striking absence of conventional pieties. He remembers the death of an eight-year-old girl, whose body was found on reclaimed land called Inch Levels on the shoreline of Lough Swilly. And he is visited by his beloved but troubled sister Margaret and by his despised brother-in-law Robert, and by Sarah, his hard, unchallengeable mother.

Each of them could talk about events in the past that might explain the bleakness of their relationships, but leaving things unsaid has become a way of life. Guilt and memory beat against them, as shock waves from bombs in Derry travel down the river to shake the windows of those who have escaped the city.

 

A perceptive and moving study of remorse and resilience, of the legacy violence leaves behind, and of the intricacies of family life; in the world as Neil Hegarty conjures it, old secrets never die, and what’s past is never past.”               John Banville.

Unsettling and thought-provoking, with just enough ambiguity and nuance to convince, this is a bold and well-crafted debut.”                        Irish Times

Hegarty has a gift for lyrical description, and his authorial detachment adds to a pervading sense of bleakness.”                         Daily Mail

 

 

 

Selection Day by Aravind Adiga

The most exciting novelist writing in English today.”                      A. N. Wilson

 

Manjunath Kumar is fourteen. He knows he is good at cricket – if not as good as his elder brother Radha. He knows that he fears and resents his domineering and cricket-obsessed father, admires his brilliantly talented sibling and is fascinated by the world of CSI and by curious and interesting scientific facts. But there are many things, about himself and about the world, that he doesn’t know . . . Sometimes it seems as though everyone around him has a clear idea of who Manju should be, except Manju himself.

When Manju begins to get to know Radha’s great rival, a boy as privileged and confident as Manju is not, everything in Manju’s world begins to change and he is faced with decisions that will challenge both his sense of self and of the world around him . . .

 

“Selection Day is at its heart an engrossing and nuanced coming-of-age-novel . . . intriguing and subtly developed . . . [Adiga] has succeeded in composing a powerful individual story that, at the same time, does justice to life’s (and India’s) great indeterminacies.”                     Sunday Times

“[A] finely told, often moving, and intelligent novel . . . Adiga’s novel takes in class, religion and sexuality – all issues that disrupt the dream of a sport that cares for nothing but talent and temperament. Because Adiga is a novelist, and one who has grown in his art since his Booker prizewinning debut, The White Tiger, he knows how to talk about all these matters through his characters and their compelling stories.”             Kamila Shamsie, Guardian

“[Adiga] has always been drawn to that gap between the glitter and gleam of India Shining and the violence, inequality and social misery that give a partial lie to the nation’s desire to rebrand itself . . . [he] has written another snarling, witty state-of-the-nation address about a country in thrall to values that 19th-century moralists would have damned as “not cricket”.            
Observer

“Top-rate fiction from a young master . . . Adiga’s plot is gripping.”                       The Times

“Selection Day is a captivating and sensitive coming-of-age story . . . Adiga’s characters are getting more complex with each book, and this complexity makes his indictment of the contemporary world all the more urgent and convincing.”                Hirsh Sawhney, TLS

 

 

 

Resolution by A.N. Wilson

 

A.N. Wilson’s powerful new novel explores the life and times of one of the greatest British explorers, Captain Cook, and the golden age of Britain’s period of expansion and exploration.
Wilson’s protagonist, witness to Cook’s brilliance and wisdom, is George Forster, who travelled with Cook as botanist on board the HMS Resolution, on Cook’s second expedition to the southern hemisphere, and penned a famous account of the journey. Resolution moves back and forth across time, to depict Forster’s time with Cook, and his extraordinary later life, which ended with his death in Paris, during the French Revolution.
Wilson once again demonstrates his great powers as a master craftsman of the historical and the human in this richly evoked novel, which brings to life the real and the extraordinary, brilliantly drawing together a remarkable cast of characters in order to look at human endeavour, ingenuity and valour.

 

 

 

 

Fairy Tales

Beyond the Woods: Fairy Tales Retold edited by Paula Guran

Once upon a time, the stories that came to be known as fairy tales were cultivated to entertain adults more than children; it was only later that they were tamed and pruned into less thorny versions intended for youngsters. But in truth, they have continued to prick the imaginations of readers at all ages.
Over the years, authors have often borrowed bits and pieces from these stories, grafting them into their own writing, creating literature with both new meaning and age-old significance. In the last few decades or so, they ve also intentionally retold and reinvented the tales in a variety of waysdelightful or dark, wistful or wicked, sweet or satiricalthat forge new trails through the forests of fantastic fiction.
This new anthology compiles some of the best modern fairy-tale retellings and reinventions from award-winning and bestselling authors, acclaimed storytellers, and exciting new talents, into an enchanting collection. Explore magical new realms by traveling with us, “Beyond the Woods” . . .

Non-fiction

Memories from Moscow to the Black Sea by Teffi

 

Image result for teffi memories from moscowWonderfully idiosyncratic, coolly heartfelt and memorable.” William Boyd

I never imagined such a memoir could be possible… enthralling.” Antony Beevor

A vividly idiosyncratic personal account of the disintegration of Tsarist Russia after the Revolution, as alive to the farcical and the ridiculous as it is to the tragic; a bit like what Chekhov might have written if he had lived to experience it.”            Michael Frayn

 

The writer and satirist Teffi was a literary sensation in Russia until war and revolution forced her to leave her country for ever. Memories is her blackly funny and heartbreaking account of her final, frantic journey into exile across Russia-travelling by cart, freight train and rickety steamer-and the ‘ordinary and unheroic’ people she encounters. From refugees setting up camp on a dockside to a singer desperately buying a few ‘last scraps’ of fabric to make a dress, all are caught up in the whirlwind; all are immortalized by Teffi’s penetrating gaze.

Fusing exuberant wit and bitter horror, this is an extraordinary portrayal of what it means to say goodbye, with haunting relevance in today’s new age of diaspora. Published in English for the first time, it confirms the rediscovery of Teffi as one of the most humane, perceptive observers of her time, and an essential writer for ours.

 

Darkly funny… she did write in this very charming, humorous and light way that allowed her to slip in these satirical points in a way that was acceptable.”                       BBC Radio 4 Open Book

Memories might have been relentlessly bleak if it were not for its humour and Teffi’s indestructible positivity… Teffi’s world becomes somewhere we do not want to leave.”                                   Guardian

“Highly readable… she is not afraid to look into the depths of what human beings can do to one another and what happens when civilisation breaks down.”       Financial Times

“She always finds the funny but never loses sight of the sadness in the madness. Awesome.”                    Big Issue

“[Teffi] succeeds in conveying the sense of claustrophobia and disorientation that are the refugee condition.”                           New York Times Book Review

“[A] remarkable memoir… perhaps this is the essence of Teffi, the quality that makes her writing both potent and endearing: she pitches in.”                  New Statesman

 

 

 

Science & the City: The Mechanics Behind the Metropolis by Laurie Winkless

Cities are a big deal. More people now live in them than don’t, and with a growing world population, the urban jungle is only going to get busier in the coming decades. But how often do we stop to think about what makes our cities work?

Cities are built using some of the most creative and revolutionary science and engineering ideas – from steel structures that scrape the sky to glass cables that help us communicate at the speed of light – but most of us are too busy to notice. Science and the City is your guidebook to that hidden world, helping you to uncover some of the remarkable technologies that keep the world’s great metropolises moving.

Laurie Winkless takes us around cities in six continents to find out how they’re dealing with the challenges of feeding, housing, powering and connecting more people than ever before. In this book, you’ll meet urban pioneers from history, along with today’s experts in everything from roads to time, and you will uncover the vital role science has played in shaping the city around you. But more than that, by exploring cutting-edge research from labs across the world, you’ll build your own vision of the megacity of tomorrow, based on science fact rather than science fiction.

Science and the City is the perfect read for anyone curious about the world they live in.

 

“Offers a unique insight into the revolutionary thinking that is shaping big cities around the world.”                   Sunday Times

“Provides a fun and engaging insight into how cutting-edge technology is shaping our cities. Winkless’s love of science and curiosity shines through.”                       Irish Independent

 

“Fascinating, lucid and entertaining; her infectious enthusiasm for the subject lights up every page.”                  John O’Farrell, comedy scriptwriter and author of The Man Who Forgot His Wife

 

 

Take Six Girls: The Lives of the Mitford Sisters by Laura Thompson

 

Image result for take six girls mitfordThe eldest was a razor-sharp novelist of upper-class manners; the second was loved by John Betjeman; the third was a fascist who married Oswald Mosley; the fourth idolized Hitler and shot herself in the head when Britain declared war on Germany; the fifth was a member of the American Communist Party; the sixth became Duchess of Devonshire.

They were the Mitford sisters: Nancy, Pamela, Diana, Unity, Jessica and Deborah. Born into country-house privilege in the early years of the 20th century, they became prominent as ‘bright young things’ in the high society of interwar London. Then, as the shadows crept over 1930s Europe, the stark – and very public – differences in their outlooks came to symbolize the political polarities of a dangerous decade.

The intertwined stories of their stylish and scandalous lives – recounted in masterly fashion by Laura Thompson – hold up a revelatory mirror to upper-class English life before and after WWII.

 

“I was enthralled and charmed by this group biography of all six Mitford sisters, which tells the intertwined stories of their stylish scandalous lives in a fresh and admirably concise way – and with a striking contemporary sensibility too.”                 Bookseller, Editor’s Choice

“Engaging … Thompson’s is an astute, highly readable and well assembled book, and she writes with particular intelligence about the sisters’ self-mythologising and their ongoing hold on the public imagination.”                   Observer

“Thompson is marvellous at mapping and explicating the webs or skeins of sibling rivalry [in this] gripping and appalling family saga.”                        The Times

“The first book to consider “the whole six-pack” in the post-Mitford age. And what a remarkable story it is … Thompson retells the story with great style and illuminating detail.”                        Independent

 

 

Feminist Fight Club by Jessica Bennett

Engaging, hilarious and practical – I will proudly proclaim myself a card-carrying member of the FFC.”             Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook and bestselling author of Lean In

This is a call to arms.

Are you aged zero to infinity? Finished with the sexist status quo? Ready to kick ass and take names?

Welcome to the Feminist Fight Club. You have lifetime membership.

Feminist Fight Club provides an arsenal of weapons for surviving in an unequal world. You will learn how to fight micro-aggressions, correct unconscious bias, deal with male colleagues who can’t stop ‘manterrupting’ or ‘bro-propriating’ your ideas – and how to lean in without falling the f*ck over.

Every woman needs this book – and they needed it yesterday.

This is not a drill.

 

“I’ll be buying this for any young woman I know starting out on her career … It is invaluable wisdom.”               Sunday Times

“Funny and fresh … One of those books that every person, not just every woman, should read.”              Glamour

“A classic, f*ck-you feminist battle guide, with unapologetic strategies for how to get down and strength up with female comrades to fight patriarchy on the daily. Every woman should have a Feminist Fight Club.”                   Ilana Glazer, comedian and co-creator of BROAD CITY

“This book offers the weapons that women need to win the war on inequality. With mighty wit, Jessica Bennett shows women how to defeat the enemies – and men how to stop being enemies. I was not prepared to laugh out loud so many times while learning so much about a serious topic. “                      
Adam Grant, bestselling author of ORIGINALS and GIVE AND TAKE

 

 

Why It’s Not All Rocket Science: Scientific Theories and Experiments Explained by Robert Cave

In Why It’s Not All Rocket Science , Robert Cave examines 100 extraordinary projects, theories and experiments that have been conducted in the name of science. Some, including various nuclear tests, have attracted controversy and hostility; others, such as Johann Wilhelm Ritter’s erotic self-experiments with a voltaic pile, seem downright weird. But Cave demonstrates, thoroughly and informatively, that it is only by doggedly asking awkward questions, and paying close attention to the answers, that scientists have been able to make progress.
From spider monkeys to human cyborgs, and from swimming in syrup to chaos theory, Cave places each experiment and discovery in its scientific context to present an entertaining guide to some of the most jaw-dropping entries in the history of science. Why It’s Not All Rocket Science contains chapters on the brain, the body, society and communications, planet Earth and the Universe, and to read it is to gain startling insights into why scientists seem to behave so oddly, and how their brilliant if sometimes bizarre work benefits all of society.

 

 

Lara: The Untold Love Story that Inspired Doctor Zhivago by Anna Pasternak

The heartbreaking story of the passionate love affair between Boris Pasternak and Olga Ivinskaya – the tragic true story that inspired ‘Doctor Zhivago’.

‘Doctor Zhivago’ has sold in its millions yet the true love story that inspired it has never been fully explored. Pasternak would often say ‘Lara exists, go and meet her’, directing his visitors to the love of his life and literary muse, Olga Ivinskaya. They met in 1946 at the literary journal where she worked. Their relationship would last for the remainder of their lives.

Olga paid an enormous price for loving ‘her Boria’. She became a pawn in a highly political game and was imprisoned twice in Siberian labour camps because of her association with him and his controversial work. Her story is one of unimaginable courage, loyalty, suffering, tragedy, drama and loss.

Drawing on both archival and family sources, Anna Pasternak’s book reveals for the first time the critical role played by Olga in Boris’s life and argues that without Olga it is likely that Doctor Zhivago would never have been completed or published.

 

Meticulously researched.”                Sunday Times

 

Anna Pasternak has produced an irresistible account of joy, suffering and passion.”                    Financial Times

 

A story with enough romance and suffering to make a moving novel or film in its own right.”                Observer

 

Anna Pasternak does not spare an ounce of drama nor detail from the story of her great uncle’s love affair with Olga Ivinskaya, the inspiration for Doctor Zhivago’s Lara. The result is a profoundly moving meditation on love, loyalty, and, ultimately, forgiveness.”                        Amanda Foreman

 

 

When Zuma Goes by Ralph Mathekga

 

Image result for When Zuma Goes by Ralph MathekgaWhen Jacob Zuma retires to Nkandla, what will be left behind?

South Africa has been in the grip of the “Zunami” since May 2009: Scandal, corruption and allegations of state capture have become synonymous with the Zuma era, leaving the country and its people disheartened.

But Jacob Zuma’s time is running out. Whether he leaves the presidency after the ANC’s national conference in 2017, stays on until 2019, or is forced to retire much sooner, the question is: what impact will his departure have on South Africa, its people and on the ruling party? Can we fix the damage, and how?

Ralph Mathekga answers these questions and more as he puts Zumaʼs leadership, and what will come after, in the spotlight.

 

 

Student, Comrade, Prisoner, Spy by Bridget Hilton-Barber

 

Image result for Student, Comrade, Prisoner, Spy by Bridget Hilton-BarberWhen Bridget Hilton-Barber got on a train to Grahamstown in 1982 to study journalism at Rhodes University, she had no idea of the brutal drama that would unfold.

 

A rebellious young woman, she became politically involved in anti-apartheid organisations and was caught up in the massive resistance and repression sweeping the Eastern Cape at the time. She ended up spending three months in detention without trial, and after her release discovered she had been betrayed by one of her best friends, Olivia Forsyth, who was a spy for the South African security police.

 

Thirty years later, a horrific flashback triggers Bridget’s journey back to the Eastern Cape to see if she can forgive her betrayer and finally let go of the extraordinary violence she encountered in the final days of apartheid. This is her powerful story.

 

 

Field Guide to Lies and Statistics by Daniel Levitin

 

Image result for Field Guide to Lies and Statistics by Daniel LevitinThe bestselling author of The Organized Mind explains and debunks statistics in the information age

We live in a world of information overload. Facts and figures on absolutely everything are at our fingertips, but are too often biased, distorted, or outright lies. From unemployment figures to voting polls, IQ tests to divorce rates, we’re bombarded by seemingly plausible statistics on how people live and what they think. In a world where anyone can become an expert at the click of a button, being able to see through the tricks played with statistics is more necessary than ever before. Daniel Levitin teaches us how to effectively ask ourselves: can we really know that? And how do they know that?

In this eye-opening, entertaining and accessible guide filled with fascinating examples and practical takeaways, acclaimed neuroscientist Daniel Levitin shows us how learning to understand statistics will enable you to make quicker, better-informed decisions to simplify your life.

 

“A Field Guide to Lies by the neuroscientist Daniel Levitin lays out the many ways in which each of us can be fooled and misled by numbers and logic, as well as the modes of critical thinking we will need to overcome this.”                    The Wall Street Journal 

 

 

 

Virago Book of Women Gardeners edited by Deborah Kellaway

 

Image result for Virago Book of Women Gardeners edited by Deborah KellawayFrom diggers and weeders, to artists and colourists, writers and dreamers to trend-setters, plantswomen to landscape designers, women have contributed to the world of gardening and gardens. Here Deborah Kellaway, author of The Making of an English Country Garden and Favourite Flowers , has collected extracts from the 18th century to the present day, to create a book that is replete with anecdotes and good-humoured advice. Colette, Margery Fish, Germaine Greer, Eleanor Sinclair Rohde, Vita Sackville-West, Rosemary Verey, Edith Wharton and Dorothy Wordsworth are some of the writers represented in this book.

 

“A glorious and fertile compendium”.                        Independent

“Kellaway’s intelligent and tender book enlarges the sense of human possibility.”                         Observer

“Boldly editied, the equivalent of a well-planted border with not a gap of bare earth, all season-colour interest, and no visible pea-sticks.”                   Lynne Truss, Sunday Times

 

 

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer

 

Image result for The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy SchumerThe highly anticipated first book from award-winning comedian, writer, producer and actress, Amy Schumer.

In The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, Amy shares stories about her family, her relationships, her career, good – and bad – sex, recounting the experiences that have shaped who she is today: from the riches to rags story of her childhood to her teenage quest for popularity (and boys) to becoming one of the most sought-after comedians on the planet and an outspoken advocate for women’s rights.

Whether she’s experiencing lust at first sight in the queue at the airport, discovering her boot camp instructor’s secret bad habit, or candidly discussing her father’s multiple sclerosis, Amy Schumer proves to be a fearless, original, and always entertaining storyteller. Her book will move you, make you laugh, catch you completely off guard, and answer this burning question: is it okay for a 35 year-old woman to still sleep with her childhood teddy bears?

 

Amy Schumer’s deadpan honesty shines through in these hilarious, moving vignettes about life, love and her early years.”             Observer

 

This book is soulful, hilarious and deeply necessary.”                     Lena Dunham

 

Schumer has written a probing, confessional, unguarded, and, yes, majorly humanizing non-memoir, a book that trades less on sarcasm, and more on emotional resonance.”           Vogue

 

Schumer is a talented storyteller. She’s known for standing in a spotlight and sharing every corner of her soul with thousands of strangers. So it’s no surprise that her book is packed with hilarious, honest and often vulnerably raw details of her life… Readers will laugh and cry, and may put the book down from moments of honesty that result in uncomfortable realistic details from her life.”                    Washington Post

 

 

 

Emily Hobhouse: Beloved Traitor by Elsabé Brits

 

Image result for Emily Hobhouse: Beloved Traitor by Elsabé BritsA fresh, nuanced look at an extraordinary woman and her lifelong fight for justice. Defying the constraints of her gender and class, Emily Hobhouse travelled across continents and spoke out against oppression. A passionate pacifist and a feminist, she opposed both the 1899-1902 Anglo-Boer War and World War One, which led to accusations of treason. Despite saving thousands of lives in two wars, she died alone – an unsung hero in her own country. Elsabé Brits travelled in Emily Hobhouse’s footsteps, retracing her inspirational, often astonishing story. In Canada the author discovered Hobhouse’s handwritten notebooks, scrapbooks and letters in a trunk. With Emily Hobhouse: Beloved Traitor, she brings to life a colourful story of war, heroism and passion, spanning three continents.

 

 

 

 

 

Graphic and Art

 

A History of Pictures by David Hockney and Martin Gayford

 

Image result for hockney history of picturesThe making of pictures has a history going back perhaps 100,000 years to an African shell used as a paint palette. Two-thirds of it is irrevocably lost, since the earliest images known to us are from about 40,000 years ago. But what a 40,000 years, explored here by David Hockney and Martin Gayford in a brilliantly original book. They privilege no medium, or period, or style, but instead, in 16 chapters, discuss how and why pictures have been made, and insistently link ‘art’ to human skills and human needs.
Each chapter addresses an important question: What happens when we try to express reality in two dimensions? Why is the ‘Mona Lisa’ beautiful and why are shadows so rarely found in Chinese, Japanese and Persian painting? Why are optical projections always going to be more beautiful than HD television can ever be? How have the makers of images depicted movement? What makes marks on a flat surface interesting?
Energized by two lifetimes of looking at pictures, combined with a great artist’s 70-year experience of experimentation as he makes them, this profoundly moving and enlightening volume will be the art book of the decade.

 

“What makes some pictures a masterpiece? Who better to explain than our greatest living artist, as he teams up with art critic Martin Gayford to open your eyes to the works of genius he holds dear.”                Mail on Sunday 

“His sharp and often delightfully slanted take on pictures, explained in clear terms, crisps up perceptions and help readers to look anew.”                       Rachel Campbell-Johnston, The Times

 

“Reality,” Hockney says, “is a slippery concept.” And that is why this book is so utterly fascinating. It is why, when I had finished reading it through, I immediately sat down to read it again. And why I keep dipping into it. Whether they are telling us about the history of scientific instruments, such as the telescope (Gayford is especially good on this), or revisiting images we thought were familiar, such as the mirror in Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait, or the Mona Lisa, they always have something original to say.”                       AN Wilson, Sunday Times

 

 

Black Panther by Ta-Nehisi Coates

 

Image result for Black Panther by Ta-Nehisi CoatesMacArthur Genius and National Book Award-winner T- Nehisi Coates (Between the World and Me) takes the helm, confronting T’Challa with a dramatic upheaval in Wakanda. When a superhuman terrorist group that calls itself The People sparks a violent uprising, the land famed for its incredible technology and proud warrior traditions will be thrown into turmoil. If Wakanda is to survive, it must adapt – but can its monarch survive the necessary change? Collecting: Black Panther 1-4

 

 

 

Survivor’s Club by Lauren Beukes

 

Image result for Survivor's Club by Lauren BeukesWhat if the horror movies of the 1980s were real?
Where are those kids today?

The haunted house, the demonic doll, the cursed video game, the monstrous neighbor, the vengeful ghost, the killer imaginary friend…in 1987 a wave of horrors struck six communities around the globe. Six traumatized kids survived those events, and grew up haunted by what happened to them.

Almost 30 years later, the six survivors are drawn together in Los Angeles to confront a terrifying childhood nightmare that has returned, bringing up their own traumas and dragging their dark secrets into the light. Somehow, they’re all connected. But when personal horrors collide, they’ll be forced to confront one another’s demons.

And then they’ll discover that staying alive was only the beginning…

Award-winning novelist Lauren Beukes and co-writer Dale Halvorsen join artist Ryan Kelly for a bloody journey of self-discovery in SURVIVORS’ CLUB, a terrifying new vision of horror in an inescapably interconnected world. Collects #1-9.

 

 

Happy Reading!

Launch of The Emergence of The South African Metropolis by Vivian Bickford-Smith

Thursday, October 20th 2016 at 6:00 PM

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Launch of For Friends & Family by Nicky Stubbs

Wednesday, October 19th 2016 at 6:00 PM

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Launch of Safest Place you Know by Mark Winkler

Tuesday, October 18th 2016 at 5:30 PM

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After his father’s violent death on a hot November day in the droughtstricken Free State, a young man leaves the derelict family farm with no plan, and with no way of knowing that his life will soon be changed for ever by two strangers he encounters on his journey south: a mute little girl who bears a striking resemblance to his late niece, and a troubled lawyer who detests the Cape wine estate she’s inherited from a father she despised.
Set in South Africa against the backdrop of a country in flux, The Safest Place You Know  is a powerful story, rendered in meticulously crafted, lyrical prose, about redemption and recovery, and what it means to carry the past with you.

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Launch of Safest Place you Know by Mark Winkler

Tuesday, October 18th 2016 at 5:30 PM

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Boekbekendstelling van Wat die Hart van Vol Is deur Peter Veldsman

Monday, October 17th 2016 at 5:30 PM

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Launch of Who Killed Piet Barol? by Richard Mason

Thursday, October 13th 2016 at 5:30 PM

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Former tutor Piet Barol and singer Stacey Meadows are making a splash in colonial Cape Town. Styling themselves as the Vicomte and Vicomtesse de Barol, they have been living by their wits – but as the world drifts towards war, their quest for comfort and riches has brought them close to bankruptcy. With creditors at their heels, their furniture business is imploding and only a major win will save them.

Stacey finds the ideal stooge: a mining magnate with a mansion to furnish. Piet enlists two Xhosa men to lead him into the magical forest of Gwadana, in search of a fabled tree. He needs precious wood, but he doesn’t want to pay for it.

The Natives Land Act has just abolished property rights for the majority of black South Africans, and whole families have been ripped apart. As Piet’s charm, charisma and appetite for risk lead him far beyond the safety of the privileged white world, he does not comprehend the enormous price of the lies he has told, nor where they will lead him . . .

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